Skip to main content

more options


College of Veterinary Medicine | 2005

“Computer-generated Cases for Fluid Therapy”

Richard Rawson

About

Students need to learn the basic scientific principles underlying fluid imbalances and develop an understanding of fluid therapy. Prior to Rawson's innovation, paper-based case studies were used to illustrate concepts. But real patients change over time and respond dynamically to intervention, and Rawson wanted a way for students to interact with a changing "patient" and practice problem-solving. He was also hoping that by running cases over again, that they would reinforce their understanding and gain confidence.

Rawson created a set of "sick dog" simulations. Students interacted with these dynamic cases -- each required the application of basic principles of assessment, diagnosis, and therapy, flexibility in the application of those principles; and the ability to adapt therapeutic plans over time. Rawson's simulations helped solidify students' understanding of the underlying science, and also engendered a sense of self-confidence in treating critically ill patients. Using the simulation students were able to improve their ability to apply basic principles with flexibility, and gain a sense for the "art" of fluid therapy.

Technologies

  • STELLA modeling software
  • custom graphics

Publications

A simulation for teaching the basic and clinical science of fluid therapy

Rawson, Richard E, Marilyn E. Dispensa, Richard E. Goldstein, Kimberley W. Nicholson and Noni Korf Vidal. 2008. A simulation for teaching the basic and clinical science of fluid therapy. Advances in Physiology Education 33: 202-208.

Back to Project Listing

Innovation Blog

blogs.cornell.edu/innovation
Updates, projects, events, instructional technologies, and more.